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Summer school in Biodiversity Modelling 2022

The 2022 edition of the summer school, which will take place from August 22 to 26, 2022 at the Centre de Villégiature Jouvence in Orford, will be on the theme: Biodiversity changes and data visualization. The course will take the form of a workshop during which the students, in collaboration with local organizations involved in biodiversity monitoring, will develop a web platform for visualizing biodiversity changes.

PhD Opportunity: Monitoring the impacts of climate change on biodiversity

The Government of Quebec’s Biodiversity Monitoring Network is the first large-scale project in Quebec to document changes in biodiversity on a large scale. It was developed through the 2013-2020 Action Plan on Climate Change in partnership with the Ministère des Forêts de la Faune et des Parcs (MFFP) and the Ministère de l’Environnement et de la Lutte aux Changements Climatiques (MELCC). Nearly 250 sites have been monitored since 2016, using about thirty indicators and taxonomic groups in a variety of environments (forest, tundra, bog, marsh, lake and river).

We are looking for a PhD student to synthesize the observations and develop interpretation tools.

Introduction to microbiome analysis

An Introduction to Microbiome Analysis workshop will be presented as part of the BIOS² training program by Professor Steven Kembel (UQAM) on May 19 and 20, 2022 from 1 pm to 4 pm Eastern Time .

This workshop will give an overview of the theory and practice of using metabarcoding approaches to study the diversity of microbial communities. The workshop will give participants an understanding of 1) the current methods for microbiome diversity quantification using metabarcoding/amplicon sequencing approaches and 2) the normalization and diversity analysis approaches that can be used to quantify the diversity of microbial communities.

Forecasting biodiversity: A matter of data availability

In a previous post, we briefly discussed our internship experience with GEO BON, in which we developed a forecasting model of local contributions to beta diversity (LCBD) at the regional scale, using communities of warblers species in Quebec and Colombia as a case study. The first part of our endeavor was getting access to data. As typical grad students in quantitative ecology, we used data mostly openly available on the internet. As mentioned in the previous post, for species occurrence, we used data from the eBird database, while environmental and land-use data were obtained from the CHELSA database and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (ORNL DAAC), respectively. While these datasets are openly available, the steps required to actually use them and the digital space they occupy could represent a challenge for someone unfamiliar with such a task.